Flooding is something that can impact any Californian. In fact, all of California’s 58 counties have had at least one flood emergency in the last two decades, and an astounding 20 percent of all California residents live in a floodplain.

Because there are more than $580 billion in assets and property subject to flood risks – not to mention millions of people – everyone in the state must take rushing and rising water seriously. When a flood strikes, loss of life can be devastating, and flood damage restoration to put things back as they should be can cost millions and take weeks or months.

The state and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers have been working for decades to cut flood risk and reduce consequences when a catastrophic water event happens. Plus, local agencies in San Diego and across local counties and the state have done their part in many cases to control flooding in the best ways they know how.

Still, more must be done.

The Department of Water Resources at the state level as well as the Army Corps of Engineers have developed a plan related to the future of flooding in the state that’s based on four important principles:

  1. Flooding can’t be completely eliminated. While flood management efforts can go a long way toward cutting the risks and consequences associated with flooding, the risk will never go away. Still, flood management can improve the safety of the public, create a sense of environmental responsibility and stewardship and help support increased economic stability.
  1. Multiple-benefit programs are best. When flood management solutions are created with the entire system in mind, there is the best chance of success and public resources are used most responsibly. Going it alone isn’t likely to be successful for something as big as flooding concerns.
  1. Cooperation enhances flood management. Flood management is, of course, the responsibility of all levels of government, and cooperation makes for the best chance of success. Local, state and U.S. government officials must share responsibility for flood management, especially since dealing with flooding often requires working across jurisdictional and geographic boundaries toward overall solutions.
  1. Climate change and other outside factors must be taken into consideration. For flood management solutions to be effective, public agencies at all governmental levels must create solutions that take into account as many variables as possible, including the increasing risk and volatility that could be the result of global climate change.

And something else is certain: now’s the time for California to work to prevent future catastrophic flooding events. That makes sense from a cost perspective, from the perspective of preserving human life whenever possible and from the perspective of environmental responsibility.

At Orange Restoration, we support efforts to prevent natural disasters – because that makes much more sense and costs much less in the long run than cleaning up after them. While there will always be flooding and a need for disaster recovery services like those our company provides, there are flood management solutions that can reduce the day-to-day risk for so many Californians.

We want the very best for California, and that means decreasing flooding risk even though the risk can never be entirely eliminated. And we support any government effort that moves us closer to better prediction, better avoidance and better recovery from flooding so that California’s citizens are protected and our economy stays strong and gets even stronger in the months, years, decades and even centuries to come.

There are many things that can be done. But when they don’t work, we’ll be here to help you pick up the pieces – (619) 376-6838.

Four Important Points About Managing California Flood Risks And Protecting Our Future
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