mold damage areaIf mold is present in only one small location in your home and doesn’t involve any porous materials, you may be able to remove it yourself using one of several home remedies and natural solutions. But use caution: you can subject yourself to additional mold exposure and cause mold to go airborne in your home if you do the mold remediation incorrectly.

Plus, you need to be absolutely certain that the small patch of mold you know about is actually the only one present. Otherwise, you could be killing and removing an obvious bit of mold while allowing a larger and unseen growth of mold go unchecked.

If you’re sure you want to tackle your project yourself, consider one of these cleaners:

Bleach. While mold remediators will often tell you that bleach only decolorizes mold rather than killing it, it may be all you need for small areas of mold. It works great on non-porous materials like bathtubs, tile, countertops and glass but does not penetrate well. It isn’t a good choice for drywall or wood. Since bleach produces harsh fumes, make sure the area in which it will be used is ventilated well. Wear gloves too. A cup of bleach per gallon of water should be more than enough, then spray or sponge on and wipe away. There’s no need to rinse since bleach inhibits future growth. Remember, it will decolor fabric and some other materials too.

Borax. A natural product that isn’t even toxic if swallowed, there’s no toxic smell or fumes when you get rid of mold with borax. This simple white powder — actually a naturally occurring mineral — is similar in many ways to baking soda but cleans better. Create a solution using a cup of borax in a gallon of water. Vacuum away lose mold first with a vacuum that has a HEPA filter and then scrub the mold away. Wipe away any powdery liquid that remains and vacuum again if necessary. There’s no need to rinse unless a white residue is left behind.

Vinegar. Also generally non-toxic, vinegar kills most — but not all — kinds of mold. But it’s safe, non-toxic and the smell isn’t harmful like the bleach smell is. Plus, vinegar is cheap and available in all supermarkets. Spray it on full strength, let it sit an hour and then clean the area. The remaining vinegar smell will go away within a few hours.

There are other cleaners that can be used for small patches of mold remediation too. These include:

  • ammonia, a harsh chemical with toxic fumes that works on non-porous surfaces
  • hydrogen peroxide, a safe compound that kills bacteria, fungus and more
  • baking soda
  • tea tree oil
  • grapefruit seed oil

You can even remove small amounts of mold with mild detergent and water. But how can you be sure you’re getting it all with any of these methods? For the very best results, contact Orange Restoration at (619) 376-6838 for professional mold remediation by experts who make sure they complete the job.

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